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Raubhautz*
 
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2012-09-12 13:47:00

Hello,

I have 3 projects; one I am trying to keep as a primary and utilize 1/2 - 2/3 of the resources (approximately) and split the remainder between two other projects.

My current machine for crunching is an i7 (2960XM w/8 cores), so I was envisioning, at idle times, 4 cores working on the primary project, and 2 each on the other 2 projects, give or take depending on priorities.

What I get is usually one project dominating the resources of the cpu (all 8 cores) and another project running the GPU.

So, is there something I need to know, or set to get what I wish to do, or am I likely going to be stuck with this behavior?

Thank you in advance for any guidance that can be provided.

Raub*
Odd-Rod
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2012-09-12 18:25:39
last modified: 2012-09-12 18:33:54

Boinc unfortunately doesn't work that way - although many of us would like it to.

Setting Resource Shares will achieve that, but only in the long term. That is, you will tend to crunch entirely for your primary project for a while, and then mainly for the other projects for a while. Over time the share will be according to your choices. You will get closer to your desired behaviour if you keep a minimum amount of work in the work buffer. I recently played around with this and found that if you set a large buffer, then Boinc will tend to grab a lot of work from one project at a time.


Raubhautz*
 
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2012-09-12 21:55:17

Odd-Rod wrote:

Boinc unfortunately doesn't work that way - although many of us would like it to.

Setting Resource Shares will achieve that, but only in the long term. That is, you will tend to crunch entirely for your primary project for a while, and then mainly for the other projects for a while. Over time the share will be according to your choices. You will get closer to your desired behaviour if you keep a minimum amount of work in the work buffer. I recently played around with this and found that if you set a large buffer, then Boinc will tend to grab a lot of work from one project at a time.



Ok, your description matches what I have encountered (I set a work cue of 20 days!!!), so now I know what I am dealing with, I will adjust accordingly. Thank you very much for the response.

Raub*
noderaser
 
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2012-09-23 21:46:24

I would avoid using a large queue like that, unless you absolutely need to because you're trying to cache for a WCG badge, or you're going to be off-grid for a really long time. At 20 days, you're beyond the deadline for most projects... BOINC shouldn't get work that far out if that's the case but until everything is in equilibrium, it's likely that you will have a few tasks that are automatically canceled due to not starting in time, or you'll turn them in too late and not get credit. Note that those rules vary by project.

If you're always connected to the internet, I'd set a much lower queue... On my computers, I have it set to 0.2 days, just to make sure that I don't have any idle time.
Raubhautz*
 
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2012-09-25 00:39:11

noderaser wrote:

If you're always connected to the internet, I'd set a much lower queue... On my computers, I have it set to 0.2 days, just to make sure that I don't have any idle time.


Thank you for the response, noderaser, it does appear that I should keep smaller queues - I am online about 20 hours/day.
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