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2012-09-17 11:01:22

Intel has unveiled details of its new Haswell microarchitecture, and promises that it will deliver greatly improved compute and graphics performance, drastically lower power requirements, and developer-friendly improvements when chips based on it appear next year, branded as Intel 4th Generation Core Processors.

"Haswell will be the foundation of a family of products, just like Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge were," said Ronak Singhal, Intel Senior Principal Engineer," at one of those sessions.

"The first thing to keep in mind about Haswell is that it is a converged core," he said. "Converged core means that we scale products that go all the way from high-end servers all the way down to low-power form factors like tablets, using the same core."

The same core means that developers can apply the same techniques to each iteration of the Haswell chip, since at their most basic levels their arcitectures are in common. "The important thing from a developer's perspective," Singhal said, "is that since we have a converged architecture across all of these segments, you can develop and optimize once, and then scale back across these other products."

Intel Fellow Per Hammarlund agreed. "You might scratch your head and think we're nuts, trying to have the same core from tablets to servers," he told the assembled übergeeks. "But in reality, if you think about it, the power levels that you have with just a few cores in a tablet at a very low power are very simlar to the power and power-efficiency requirements you have in tens of cores in a high-end server."

Of course, as important as developers are to Intel, the company also knows that a converged core architecture adds to their own bottom line. "It's actually good for us from a stingy point of view," said Hammarlund, referring to the advantages of the modularity inherent in a converged-core architecture.


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2012-09-24 20:50:43


The new Haswell microarchitecture was touted by Intel's Architecture Group headman David Perlmutter as being designed with mobility in mind. In pursuit of that goal, he said that Haswell will require just one-twentieth of the idle power – that's full platform power, not just CPU power – of the second-generation core processors, code-named Sandy Bridge.

Perlmutter emphasized Haswell's future appearance in sleek tablets and Ultrabooks, followed eventually by desktops and workstations. In the more-technical sessions that followed Perlmutter's rather fluffy keynote, however, Intel engineers added data centers to Haswell's future turf.

During those sessions, a wealth of Haswell details were shared, explaining how Intel is counting on 22-nanometer Haswell chips to be faster, more power-miserly, and more media-friendly than their predecessors – and to finally move Intel into the tablet and handset market that continues to elude it.


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2012-12-08 01:57:52


Specs leak for 13W, 10W Ivy Bridge CPUs


Remember that rumor about Intel rolling out some lower-wattage Ivy Bridge CPUs ahead of the Haswell launch? Well, the folks at VR-Zone Chinese have gotten their hands on what looks like an Intel PowerPoint slide with specs for five new Intel processors—and their TDPs are as low as 10W. Ooh...

Apparently known as the "Y" series, these processors will show up in the first quarter of next year, according to VR-Zone. At the low end, the series will include a Pentium 2129Y with two cores, two threads, a 1.1GHz core clock speed, 2MB of cache, and a 10W "nominal" TDP. Neither Turbo Boost nor HyperThreading will be on the menu for that offering.

The series flagship will be known as the Core i7-3689Y. That model will have two cores, four threads, a 1.5GHz base clock speed, a 2.6GHz peak Turbo speed, 4MB of cache, and a slightly higher 13W power envelope. Both the low-end Pentium and the high-end Core i7 will have a 850MHz graphics speed, but the i7's IGP is labeled "Intel HD Graphics 4000" in the spec sheet, while the Pentium's is just marked "Intel HD Graphics." The Pentium's IGP may simply have a few units disabled.

10W is the exact figure Intel is targeting with its next-gen Haswell mobile chips. Getting there ahead of schedule with Ivy Bridge would definitely be unexpected. VR-Zone doesn't speculate on the kinds of systems these power-sipping Ivy CPUs will drive, but I expect slimmer ultrabooks and even some tablets may be in store. Exciting stuff. (Thanks to X-bit labs for the link.)


http://techreport.com/news/24019/specs-leak-for-13w-10w-ivy-bridge-cpus
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2013-04-16 10:13:23


Intel Haswell Processors to launch on 2June:


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2013-04-16 16:05:18

Sid2 wrote:


Intel Haswell Processors to launch on 2June:

Excellent news!
Mike


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2013-05-23 13:13:57



Intel Haswell CPU - Processor and Graphics Revealed vs Ivy Bridge


What's the difference between Haswell vs Ivy Bridge?
Does the Intel Haswell need a new motherboard?
What is the Intel CPU tick-tock cycle?





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Index :: Gadgets, Games and Gizmos :: Intel 'Haswell' -- 4th Generation Core Processors
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